Core Value Statement

"A Commitment to Excellence in Knowledge Generation to Achieve Sustainability"

Aims and Objectives

The complexities and paradoxes of the society, culture, politics, identity and modernity of Gujarat have always had important ramifications far beyond its borders. What are the key ideas that have shaped this society over the decades?

Aims and Objectives

The complexities and paradoxes of the society, culture, politics, identity and modernity of Gujarat have always had important ramifications far beyond its borders. What are the key ideas that have shaped this society over the decades?

Area of Work and Activities

CCD is confined to Gujarat which consists of two main divisions: mainland Gujarat and Peninsular Gujarat. Mainland Gujarat can be again subdivided into north, central, south and eastern Gujarat.

Area of Work and Activities

CCD is confined to Gujarat which consists of two main divisions: mainland Gujarat and Peninsular Gujarat. Mainland Gujarat can be again subdivided into north, central, south and eastern Gujarat.

History

Gujarat is one of the most developed states in India. The character of its development needed scrutiny. Only robust social research could capture it.

History

Gujarat is one of the most developed states in India. The character of its development needed scrutiny. Only robust social research could capture it. 

Aims and Objectives

Social science research is necessary to deal with the numerous complex problems of society, as not all problems can be solved by the natural sciences and technology. The state, an instrument of society, needs to consider social science research as a vehicle in bringing about a desired type of society. Social sciences are meant to enlighten society. While they may not solve all problems, they help in understanding the nature of problems and in dealing with them. They try to objectively analyse and comprehend social realities. Social scientists, through their works, hold a mirror to society.

Gujarat was carved out of the erstwhile Bombay state in 1960. The complexities and paradoxes of the society, culture, politics, identity and modernity of Gujarat have always had important ramifications far beyond its borders. What are the key ideas that have shaped this society over the decades? What have been the dominant modes of its political mobilisation? What have been the dominant models of its development? What do these models mean for the politics, economy, environment and culture of the state and for the rest of India? Despite being one of the most economically developed states of India, Gujarat ranks low in the Human Development Index. Through its research network, CCD as an intellectual and activist entity endeavours to emphasise equality and to push for a desirable society inclusive of all its segments.

As concerned public intellectuals our concerns are for the “objective, fearless, constructive voice that asks the awkward questions when government, industry, religious leaders and other bulwarks of society stray from their roles of ensuring the proper functioning of a country whose hallmarks are (or should be) social and economic equality, justice for all, and the liberty to say, think and profess the fundamental requirements of good citizenship” (Romila Thapar, The Public Intellectual in India, 2015). We seek to question the existing reality with the intention of arriving at improving the human conditions in wider society.

Area of Work and Activities

CCD is confined to Gujarat which consists of two main divisions: mainland Gujarat and Peninsular Gujarat. Mainland Gujarat can be again subdivided into north, central, south and eastern Gujarat.

●  Studies

  • Study of different castes, communities and tribes as well as the processes and forces operating within them. CCD has carried out studies on the character of development, social exclusion and marginalisation of the masses. To name a few: · Geography of Riots · Development-induced Displacement in Gujarat · Historical demography of Baroda State · Changing character of the forests and its impact on tribals of Gujarat.

●  Documentation

  • The Centre has set up a specialized library on social science disciplines focused on Gujarat. It has a collection of rare books on Gujarat as well as archives. It has maintained a systematic and digitized documentation on dalits, tribals, OBCs, women, children, health, education, politics, Hindu nationalism, communal violence and so on.

●  Training

  • Relevant knowledge is shared with people through sensitization, workshops, training programs and publications. These are conducted and carried out both in the Gujarati language and using a discourse that people can understand as well as in English.

●  Consultancy

  • The Centre makes its expertise available to NGOs, government agencies, and other interested groups. It conducts need assessment as well as impact assessment of the developmental interventions by NGOs and GOs.

History

First Decade

Biswaroop Das and Lancy Lobo deliberated and finalised the name of the institute as Centre for Culture and Development. CCD was inaugurated on Monday, the 7th of May, 2001, at 10.30 a.m. by the Bishop of Baroda, Godfrey de Rosario. An inaugural workshop was held on “Globalisation and its Impacts on Gujarat.” Following the inauguration, campus development activities were undertaken, such as restructuring of space, renovation, landscaping and creating space for parking. The library was set up in four rooms. Space for a small conference room was made by breaking down a wall between two rooms.

After five years, the need was felt for a single space to house all the books and for a full-fledged conference room. The Board members were informed about this and they approved of an extension building to accommodate the library and the conference hall. The new building was inaugurated by His Lordship Bishop of Baroda on August 27, 2009. On this occasion, Lancy delivered a lecture on “The Character of Development in Gujarat with Reference to Land Acquisition, Displacement and Resettlement.”

CCD today is well equipped with ten computers, a multimedia projector, a copier, a scanner, printers, fax, digital cameras, a generator, and vehicles. However, it still lacks residential facilities for participants in on-campus programmes. A ten-year report on CCD’s activities was published for distribution to seminar participants, visitors and donors.

2011- 2016

CCD held national seminars on key issues between the years 2011 to 2016. These covered the topics of Forests and Tribals; Scenario of Employment in Gujarat; Caste and Census; Changes in a Globalising Gujarat; Land Acquisition, Displacement and Resettlement in Gujarat; Indian Federalism; Democracy in India; Tracking the Growth of the Middle Classes in India; Religion, Secularism and the Shifting Goalposts of Democracy in India; Corporate Social Responsibility; Legacy of Nehru; Marriage and Divorce; and Religious Demography in India: Myths and Realities. These seminars brought to CCD numerous scholars and intellectuals from India and abroad and raised its visibility. The media, both electronic and print, carried extensive reports of these seminars and interviews with participants.

The books published during these years are Malaria in the Social Context; Globalisation, Growth and Employment; Economy and Society in Globalising Gujarat; Federalism in India; and Trajectory of India’s Middle Classes. The year 2016 is exceptional. It will witness the publication of three new books Forests and Tribals’ Livelihood; Democracy in India; and Essays on Suicide and Self-immolation. CCD also did evaluations of important institutions in the country, such as St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai, and Indian Social Institute in Bangalore as well as in Delhi.

Professor Lord Bhikhu Parekh made an endowment to CCD to hold seminars and lectures and to bring out publications. Coming from one of world’s eminent political philosophers, this was a shot in the arm for the institution.

CCD has made concerted efforts to find financial assistance from CSR funds, but the priorities of the corporate sector do not appear to match those of CCD. The Gujarat Jesuit province has been the major provider of funds.